Monday, 31 October 2016

Tooth Bonding

Learn more about what the American Dental Association has to say about tooth bonding.


The above video is found on the American Dental Association YouTube Channel.

Irmo Smiles
Misti Raman, DMD
Jim Raman, DMD  
7321 St. Andrews Road

Irmo, SC 29063   
(803) 212-0996  
IrmoSmiles.com

Thursday, 20 October 2016

Five Surprising Reasons for Bad Breath in Children

Having your kids brush their teeth before they go to bed each night helps them learn good oral hygiene practices. And while twice-daily toothbrushing is good for developing teeth, it always enough to stop bad breath from occurring. Bad breath isn't always solely an oral health issue, there can be other causes that need a different solution. Here are five surprising causes of bad breath in children and how to stop them.
Sinus Infection
Have any of your kids complained about a sore throat or stuffy nose lately? It might be a sinus infection. Sinus issues cause fluid to collect in the nasal passages and throat, making your child's throat the perfect place for bacteria to gather. The result? Stinky breath that can't be cured with toothbrushing and mouthwash alone. If you suspect a sinus infection (potential sore throat, burning nasal passages and post nasal drip), call your doctor for a visit and see if antibiotics will be prescribed.
Foreign Objects
It may not be your first thought, but your child's bad breath could be the result of something stuck in her nasal passages. Kids are curious, and their nostrils are just the right size for inserting small items such as beads, beans, toy accessories and food. Pediatrician Dr. William Sears explains that when an object gets lodged in a child's nasal passages it can create a nasty smell. If you suspect this is what is causing your child's bad breath, you'll need a doctor to help check your child's nasal passages and remove the object.

To read the entire article written by Jae Curtis , please visit Colgate.com

Irmo Smiles
Misti Raman, DMD
Jim Raman, DMD  
7321 St. Andrews Road

Irmo, SC 29063   
(803) 212-0996  
IrmoSmiles.com

Thursday, 13 October 2016

Dental Caries: How They Are Formed and What You Can Do to Prevent Them

Dental caries (cavities) are the most common form of oral disease known to man, and the process of getting caries is called tooth decay.
Tooth decay is the destruction of your tooth enamel -- the hard, outer layer of your teeth. This issue can affect children, teens and adults. Plaque, a sticky film of bacteria, is constantly forming on your teeth. When you eat or drink foods or beverages containing sugars, the bacteria in plaque produce acids that attack tooth enamel. The stickiness of the plaque keeps these acids in contact with your teeth, and over time the enamel can break down, according to the American Dental Association (ADA).

The types of caries formed can be broken down into two major groups:

Pit and fissure caries. These are found most often on the chewing surfaces of the back (molar and premolar) teeth, and the back of the front (anterior) teeth. Your teeth are composed of several sections of enamel, and where these sections meet, pits and grooves can trap plaque, causing decay. The proper application of pit and fissure sealants, a hard plastic material applied to seal the grooves and pits when the teeth have erupted, can prevent this type of dental caries. The sealants also make it less likely that you will need restorations (fillings) on those surfaces of the teeth.

Smooth surface caries. These are found most often along the gumline or where two teeth touch (interproximal or the space between teeth), if plaque forms in those areas. With the proper use of dental floss, you can prevent most smooth surface caries in the interproximal area, and using a manual or power toothbrush along the gumline can prevent caries in that area as well.

To read the entire article written by Richard A Huot, DDS, please visit Colgate.com

Irmo Smiles
Misti Raman, DMD
Jim Raman, DMD  
7321 St. Andrews Road

Irmo, SC 29063   
(803) 212-0996  
IrmoSmiles.com

Thursday, 6 October 2016

What is Dry Mouth?

What is Dry Mouth?
Dry mouth means you don't have enough saliva, or spit, to keep your mouth moist. Everyone has a dry mouth once in a while, especially if you're nervous, upset or under stress. But if you have a dry mouth all or most of the time, it can be uncomfortable and can lead to more serious health problems or indicate that a more serious medical condition may exist. That's because saliva does more than just keep the mouth wet -it helps digest food, protects teeth from decay, prevents infection by controlling bacteria in the mouth, and makes it possible for you to chew and swallow.

There are several reasons that the glands that produce saliva, called the salivary glands, might not function properly. These include:

  • Side effects of some medications - over 400 medicines can cause dry mouth, including antihistamines, decongestants, pain killers, diuretics and medicines for high blood pressure and depression.
  • Disease - diseases that affect the salivary glands, such as diabetes, Hodgkin's, Parkinson's disease, HIV/AIDS and Sjogren's syndrome, may lead to dry mouth.
  • Radiation therapy - the salivary glands can be damaged if your head or neck are exposed to radiation during cancer treatment. The loss of saliva can be total or partial, permanent or temporary.
  • Chemotherapy - drugs used to treat cancer can make saliva thicker, or "ropey," causing your mouth to feel dry.
  • Menopause - changing hormone levels affect the salivary glands, often leaving menopausal and post-menopausal women with a persistent feeling of dry mouth.
  • Smoking - many pipe, cigar and heavy cigarette smokers experience dry mouth.

To read the entire article , please visit Colgate.com

Irmo Smiles
Misti Raman, DMD
Jim Raman, DMD  
7321 St. Andrews Road

Irmo, SC 29063   
(803) 212-0996  
IrmoSmiles.com